Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 
Depending on the agency, the government may use revenue from auctioned items to support crime-prevention programs, pay restitution to crime victims or purchase new equipment the department needs. "By providing agencies with the ability to dispose of excess assets, GSA benefits taxpayers by eliminating the need to maintain and store the unneeded property while also raising more than $300 million in revenue in just the last two years," a GSA spokesperson said.

Suter's Furniture, Waterford Crystal, Vintage Blenko Glass, Lefton China, Sterling, Silverplate, Furs, Art, Dolls, Oreck Vacuum, Black and Decker, Ryobi, Craftsman Tools, Saws, Hand Tools, Power Tools, Storage, Lawn and Garden, Outdoor Furniture, Lawn Mower, Werner Ladders, Power Washer, Generator, Sears Kenmore Sewing Machine, Collector's Plates, Sterling, Fishing Equipment, Home Improvement, and MUCH MORE!


Local Non-profit organization focused on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math youth education via participation in Competition Robotics programs is liquidating excess assets in public online auction. Machines, tools, computer equipment, hardware and furniture acquired by contribution or purchase being sold to free up space in the facility for the growing team.
We were in the process of downsizing when a friend attended a program by Mr. Will Farmer on appraising, auctions and today’s styles and trends. She relayed that our mid-century modern furniture was back in vogue. We were familiar with the Farmer name from Antiques Roadshow, but knew little about the auction business. We showed Will Farmer, now owner of the business, photographs of our furniture and he was interested. He came to our home, looked at the furniture, described the auction process and carefully reviewed the contract we would sign. From start to finish the entire process was very professional. The Salem, Virginia gallery is spacious and well organized with plenty of parking. The entire staff is very friendly and courteous. The movers were very nice and careful. We were kept informed at every step. We were given a possible range of prices each item might bring, but no promises were made. Auction day was fascinating and fun. Some items brought more than expected and some less. In the end it was a wonderful experience and one we would not hesitate to do again.
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