Cars at public auctions are often those that wouldn't sell at wholesale dealer auctions. Yes, some are flood vehicles, and Hurricane Irene should still be fresh in your mind. Some are cars quickly reconditioned in dealership shops to fill in slow periods when there's otherwise little work to be done. And many are just flat out junk. "A car that goes across the block at a public auction that isn't spewing smoke is often packed with thick racing oil to ensure it doesn't," Lang continues. "Everything at a public auction looks shiny, but shiny doesn't mean much about the quality of the car."
Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 
Real property - Primarily, this consists of developed land with buildings, usually acquired by the federal government for a specific purpose, such as a military base or office building. This also includes some U.S. Forest Service properties, which usually consist of administrative sites and facilities. The General Services Administration (GSA) is the federal agency responsible for selling developed surplus property.  
 	Selling police evidence and surplus computers and office equipment for Colorado Cities, Counties and Police Departments. Over 500 Items of Assorted Police Evidence from Local Police Departments Consisting of: Tools, Jewelry, Car Stereos, Cell Phones, Televisions, Cameras, Watches, Toys, Etc. Surplus office equipment including: Computers, Printers, Office Copiers, Wood & Metal Desks, Bookcases, 2 & 4-Drawer File Cabinets, Lateral File Cabinets, Metal Shelving, Executive & Secretarial Chairs, Office Side Chairs, More!

We were in the process of downsizing when a friend attended a program by Mr. Will Farmer on appraising, auctions and today’s styles and trends. She relayed that our mid-century modern furniture was back in vogue. We were familiar with the Farmer name from Antiques Roadshow, but knew little about the auction business. We showed Will Farmer, now owner of the business, photographs of our furniture and he was interested. He came to our home, looked at the furniture, described the auction process and carefully reviewed the contract we would sign. From start to finish the entire process was very professional. The Salem, Virginia gallery is spacious and well organized with plenty of parking. The entire staff is very friendly and courteous. The movers were very nice and careful. We were kept informed at every step. We were given a possible range of prices each item might bring, but no promises were made. Auction day was fascinating and fun. Some items brought more than expected and some less. In the end it was a wonderful experience and one we would not hesitate to do again.
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